Vince Flynn – American Assassin (#18 of 24)

My adventures with audio-books hit a bit of a road-block after the wonderful reading of The Martian I heard last time. (I’m not counting some Sherlock Holmes stories, wonderful as they were as a complete book.) So when a couple of long bus journey beckoned, I thought it was the perfect time to dive right into a right ol’ potboiler. I had an app with a limited library but The #1 New York Times bestseller for Vince Flynn and the solid ratings on GoodReads were good enough indicators that this should be a fun ride.

American Assassin was the title to be picked up because it was the first in the Mitch Rapp series, although not the first one published. I felt I might as well start properly at the beginning. Mitch Rapp is essentially James Bond + Jason Bourne + Ethan Hunt all rolled into one, and with a nicer more humble personality to boot. This we’re told without too much precursor. This is also annoying because there is zero grey to his character, making him a template, unrealistic superhero. He can do anything physically, is as courageous as could be, has a temperament which his bosses can’t sustain. He’s thoroughly unrelatable in other words.

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Dark events in his past – his girlfriend died in a hijacking – have left him thirsting for vengeance and he is enrolled (how? that we never know) in a secret program that the CIA runs. The first part of the book is about this training program and the war against a bad-ass Jack Nicholson like boss and how respect is grudgingly earned. Then they’re thrown on the field into a couple of missions, first in Berlin and then in Beirut. There’s a motley bunch of Russians, Syrians, Palestinians, Arabs – all different flavours from the cookie-cutter villain factory who need to be defeated (and they will be, whatever the odds). And I’m not even getting into the one-sided missions and the overdose of God Bless America.

American Assassin is not a terrible book – it just seems more cut out for a Hollywood movie or a young-adult literature genre. There’s some interesting parts about Beirut and if you’re particularly aware of the geo-political situation there in the 80’s and 90’s, you might be able to connect the dots, some nice details of intensive training routines and torture mechanisms – but it all grew stale for me pretty soon. I could never really get stuck in to the book, it’s solid if unspectacular. Perhaps a good first attempt for a young first-time writer. But for someone as experienced as Vince Flynn, it tells me that this is not an author after my own tastes.

Entertainment Quotient : ★★
Education Quotient : ★★
Readability : ★★★

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